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20130313
20130321
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are losing due to this tax. >> hank smith, it is pretty extraordinary depositors have to pay for a bailout they didn't necessarily authorize. what do you think about what peter said? is this a recipe that would be used elsewhere in the world? >> i highly down it, maria. look, i think we should take great confidence in our banking system now compared to where we were four or five years ago. our banks are very healthy. t.a.r.p. was a good thing. it protected the financial system and the confidence in the financial system. and our banks are in great shape -- >> they're in the worst shape they've ever been. >> oh, no. >> they're a few interest rate hikes away from insolvency. that's why the fed is keeping rates at zero. >> wait a second. peter, you're saying the banks are a couple interest point ace way from insolvency? >> why to you think when the fed did the stress tests they didn't ask the banks to stress test a collapse in the bond market? they only looked at the stock market or maybe real estate. when interest rates rise substantially, the major banks are going to fail. their balance shee
committee. hers doesn't balance the budget, but reduces the deficit over a ten-year period, using both tax increases and spending cuts. and she said it's up to the american people to pick an approach. >> they will let us know whether they want us to go back down the path of the trickle down policies that decimated the middle class and threw our economy into a tailspin, or if they would prefer the approach we've seen has worked before. tackle our deficit responsibly, reinvest in our middle class, build a strong foundation for growth, and restore the promise. >> but, of course, appealing to public opinion is part of the outside game, and that's only one aspect of this fight. there's also the inside game, because president obama went up to the hill today to continue his outreach to members of congress. he spoke to the house republican caucus. afterwards, speaker john boehner did announce a breakthrough, but he indicated it was a productive meeting. >> today was a good start. and i hope that these kinds of discussions can continue, even though we have very real differences. our job is to find
of that whole business, in terms of taxing depositors, and we know that we continue to have issues in terms of the debt crisis. we are not, necessarily, seeing solutions there. >> i think you see -- if that fear were true, you would see it reflected in the peripheral european countries. i think they mark scyprus as a special case. >> mark, how are you investing at this point? you've got $54 million under management there. you've been bullish. do you want to put new money to work here, even though the market is up 10% year-to-date? >> short answer, yes, maria. the fact of the matter is, we think the fundamental underpinnings, particularly domestically, continue to be encouraging, and we're encouraging investors as a result of some of the volatility we've had in non-u.s. equity markets, to begin the scale-in there as well, because we think valuations are even more attractive. but i do think this cypresicyprg could be a big deal. the precedent it could set relative to marketdowns of small account deposits in other peripheral countries, particularly spain and italy. and the last thing we need t
agreement where we do entitlement reform and raise some more revenue in the context of tax reform, and in doing so, we improve the competitiveness of the american economy. >> is that agreement no cuts this year or some cuts this year as far as the administration is concerned? >> you're getting to a level of detail, frankly, that these conversations have not gotten to. we're right now just engaging. the question of timing, clearly, the burden should be in the middle term to the long-term. tax and entitlement savings naturally grow from year to year to year. they don't start in the first year. taking large amounts out of the smallest part of the budget in an across-the-board is not the way anyone would have chosen to reduce the deficit and get our fiscal house back in order. i think there were better alternatives and we have a little bit of time. the conversation's engaged now. i'm hoping that over the coming weeks and months, we can work through this problem. >> every treasury secretary serves with the president. you have no way of knowing how long you'll be in the office or how mu
after its parliament rejected an international bailout package that would have taxed savers and depositors. michelle caruso-cabrera is on the ground right now. she joins us live with the very latest from cyprus. over to you, michelle. >> reporter: hey, there, maria. the very latest that the cyprus plan tried in part trying to raid a pension fund. cash in the pension fund used now and promising to pay the workers later. but their european partners said, no, that's not going to work, because all you're going to do is defer liabilities. it doesn't help your debt profile. so we don't like that. now they're working on plan "c." the question is, what is that? here's the very latest, the bank holiday, as a result of all of this indecision and inaction has been extended and now it looks like the banks will not open until tuesday of next week, a full week without the banking system operating. the minister of finance is in russia, trying to square away a deal there. we haven't had any good results from there. and then very, very worrisome, a member of the ecb talking even tougher late
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5